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Government failed to curb sorcery says MP

A BAHRAINI MP has accused the government of failing to stamp out "sorcery" and "witchcraft" - claiming a woman used it to paralyse her own husband.

The allegations were made in parliament yesterday by MP Mohammed Buqais.

He is calling for more awareness of the subject, which he argued was tearing families apart.

"I studied in school for 12 years and worked as a teacher for 15 years, but never came across any subject that addresses sorcery or witchcraft," he claimed.

"This means the government is failing to raise awareness.

"There are families that have been broken apart because of those acts.

"There is one case of a Bahraini wife who went to someone because she wanted her husband to be obedient.

"He (the practitioner) told her to mix her period blood with his food, which eventually caused her husband paralysis. He has been in that state for the past seven years."

Mr Buqais called on authorities to round up alleged practitioners who charge clients large amounts of money for their services.

"Most people committing those acts ask for BD1,000, but there are some known people who remain untouched," he said.

However, Justice, Islamic Affairs and Endowment Minister Shaikh Khalid bin Ali Al Khalifa responded by saying authorities would investigate any such complaint.

He also claimed religious leaders should do more to tackle to problem, accusing them of getting too caught up in politics and neglecting their duty to the community.

"When people have low faith in religion they tend to turn to witchcraft and sorcery," he said. "It should be the role of clergymen to speak about the wrongs of following such superstitions. "The problem is that clergymen are so busy with politics that they forget to raise awareness about these acts among others. "But people can contact us and we will take legal action immediately against those committing such acts."



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